3D ORIGAMI BOOK PDF

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International Standard Book Number (eBook - PDF) Connecting Two 3D Origami . origami creations in this book do not use. 3d origami step by step (book 1). download. 3d origami step by step (book 2). download. 3d origami step by step (book 3). download. Japanese 3D origami. 3D Origami - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. Book by Mitsuoka,Ikuko.


3d Origami Book Pdf

Author:ALTAGRACIA KILIAN
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Genre:Fiction & Literature
Pages:590
Published (Last):30.07.2016
ISBN:796-6-47993-388-7
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threadergrenacmu.ml - Free download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online for free. 3D Origami Book 4 Blockfolding. Uploaded by. Dayan Der. See Shih et al, Self-assembly of 3D prestressed tensegrity structures from DNA. (see Shih et al, Mul*layer DNA Origami Packed on a Square La ce). – Densely . Triangular Origami is a kind of origami craft in Japan, and it is called '3D Origami' My initial interest in triangular origami was sparked by the introductory book.

Types Main article: Action origami Origami not only covers still-life, there are also moving objects; Origami can move in clever ways. Action origami includes origami that flies, requires inflation to complete, or, when complete, uses the kinetic energy of a person's hands, applied at a certain region on the model, to move another flap or limb. Some argue that, strictly speaking, only the latter is really "recognized" as action origami.

Action origami, first appearing with the traditional Japanese flapping bird, is quite common. One example is Robert Lang 's instrumentalists; when the figures' heads are pulled away from their bodies, their hands will move, resembling the playing of music. Modular origami Main article: Modular origami Modular origami consists of putting a number of identical pieces together to form a complete model. Normally the individual pieces are simple but the final assembly may be tricky.

Many of the modular origami models are decorative folding balls like kusudama , the technique differs though in that kusudama allows the pieces to be put together using thread or glue. Chinese paper folding includes a style called Golden Venture Folding where large numbers of pieces are put together to make elaborate models.

Sometimes paper money is used for the modules. This style originated from some Chinese refugees while they were detained in America and is also called Golden Venture folding from the ship they came on. Wet-folding Main article: Wet-folding Wet-folding is an origami technique for producing models with gentle curves rather than geometric straight folds and flat surfaces.

The paper is dampened so it can be moulded easily, the final model keeps its shape when it dries. It can be used, for instance, to produce very natural looking animal models. Size, an adhesive that is crisp and hard when dry, but dissolves in water when wet and becoming soft and flexible, is often applied to the paper either at the pulp stage while the paper is being formed, or on the surface of a ready sheet of paper.

The latter method is called external sizing and most commonly uses Methylcellulose, or MC, paste, or various plant starches.

It was developed by John Smith in the s to help inexperienced folders or those with limited motor skills. Some designers also like the challenge of creating within the very strict constraints. Origami tessellations Origami tessellation is a branch that has grown in popularity after A tessellation is a collection of figures filling a plane with no gaps or overlaps.

In origami tessellations, pleats are used to connect molecules such as twist folds together in a repeating fashion. During the s, Shuzo Fujimoto was the first to explore twist fold tessellations in any systematic way, coming up with dozens of patterns and establishing the genre in the origami mainstream. Around the same time period, Ron Resch patented some tessellation patterns as part of his explorations into kinetic sculpture and developable surfaces, although his work was not known by the origami community until the s.

Chris Palmer is an artist who has extensively explored tessellations after seeing the Zilij patterns in the Alhambra , and has found ways to create detailed origami tessellations out of silk. Robert Lang and Alex Bateman are two designers who use computer programs to create origami tessellations.

Lucero Brazil. Kirigami Main article: Kirigami Kirigami is a Japanese term for paper cutting. Cutting was often used in traditional Japanese origami, but modern innovations in technique have made the use of cuts unnecessary. Most origami designers no longer consider models with cuts to be origami, instead using the term Kirigami to describe them. This change in attitude occurred during the s and 70s, so early origami books often use cuts, but for the most part they have disappeared from the modern origami repertoire; most modern books don't even mention cutting.

These ideas, and some of the European folding repertoire, were integrated into the Japanese tradition.

Before this, traditional Japanese sources use a variety of starting shapes, often had cuts; and if they had color or markings, these were added after the model was folded.

Akira Yoshizawa in particular was responsible for a number of innovations, such as wet-folding and the Yoshizawa—Randlett diagramming system , and his work inspired a renaissance of the art form. This includes simple diagrams of basic folds like valley and mountain folds, pleats, reverse folds, squash folds, and sinks. There are also standard named bases which are used in a wide variety of models, for instance the bird base is an intermediate stage in the construction of the flapping bird. Origami paper, often referred to as "kami" Japanese for paper , is sold in prepackaged squares of various sizes ranging from 2.

It is commonly colored on one side and white on the other; however, dual coloured and patterned versions exist and can be used effectively for color-changed models. Origami paper weighs slightly less than copy paper, making it suitable for a wider range of models. This technique allows for a more rounded sculpting of the model, which becomes rigid and sturdy when it is dry.

Foil-backed paper, as its name implies, is a sheet of thin foil glued to a sheet of thin paper. Related to this is tissue foil, which is made by gluing a thin piece of tissue paper to kitchen aluminium foil. Foil-backed paper is available commercially, but not tissue foil; it must be handmade.

Both types of foil materials are suitable for complex models. Washi is generally tougher than ordinary paper made from wood pulp, and is used in many traditional arts. Washi is commonly made using fibres from the bark of the gampi tree, the mitsumata shrub Edgeworthia papyrifera , or the paper mulberry but can also be made using bamboo , hemp , rice, and wheat.

Artisan papers such as unryu, lokta, hanji[ citation needed ], gampi, kozo, saa, and abaca have long fibers and are often extremely strong.

As these papers are floppy to start with, they are often backcoated or resized with methylcellulose or wheat paste before folding. Also, these papers are extremely thin and compressible, allowing for thin, narrowed limbs as in the case of insect models.

Paper money from various countries is also popular to create origami with; this is known variously as Dollar Origami, Orikane, and Money Origami. Tools Bone folders It is common to fold using a flat surface, but some folders like doing it in the air with no tools, especially when displaying the folding.

For instance a bone folder allows sharp creases to be made in the paper easily, paper clips can act as extra pairs of fingers, and tweezers can be used to make small folds. When making complex models from origami crease patterns , it can help to use a ruler and ballpoint embosser to score the creases. Completed models can be sprayed so they keep their shape better, and a spray is needed when wet folding.

Types Main article: Action origami Origami not only covers still-life, there are also moving objects; Origami can move in clever ways.

Action origami includes origami that flies, requires inflation to complete, or, when complete, uses the kinetic energy of a person's hands, applied at a certain region on the model, to move another flap or limb.

Some argue that, strictly speaking, only the latter is really "recognized" as action origami. Action origami, first appearing with the traditional Japanese flapping bird, is quite common. One example is Robert Lang 's instrumentalists; when the figures' heads are pulled away from their bodies, their hands will move, resembling the playing of music.

3D Origami

Modular origami Main article: Modular origami Modular origami consists of putting a number of identical pieces together to form a complete model. Normally the individual pieces are simple but the final assembly may be tricky. Once you have mastered the construction of the first piece, which is a little tricky, various shapes can be constructed as you wish. Start with a small number of pieces and proceed to more elaborate designs using a larger number of pieces.

Using origami paper: Some projects require other types which have a slightly different ratio. VU' Turn over. J Cut origami in half. Fold in half again. Fold up corner. Fold in half.

Double points.. In most cases triangles are joined by inserting double points of a triangle into the double pockets of new trianqles. Hold two pieces together, double points facing up, then stack on a new piece by inserting the middle points into the double pockets. This makes the second row that connecs the pieces of the first row at the same time.

Sc the width of Type "8" rectangle is slightly longer than a half of the length. Using flyer or wrapping paper: Fold and cut into halves. I halves again. Fold corners in. Double pocket V2 is tormed.:? IUsing craft paper: Type "C" Commercial rectangular papers are available at handicraft shops.

This Type "C" rectangle has a width slightly less than a half of the length. CD Fold in half again. J, Fold up corner. Turn over. Fold down.

Wood glue f3f 4I! Type "8" Usually commercial paper does not have thl exact ratio of 2 to 1 for its length to width.

This type piece is oftet useful. Using craft paper: Spread out from inside and press down to make squares on both sides.

Inside told". Fold to meet at the center. Inside fold"': Iylake a crease at an angle and unfold. Spread and fold up using the crease. Fold again. T urn over. Fold up upper flaps. Flip to the right, leaving little allowance, to make tail. Spread out from inside and press down to show the sides.

Fold back. Crease Fold back. A Fold down upper flap. Eyes are made. Make creases along eyes.

Fold triangles in half. Completed FROG. Insert the third piece into the second. Insert the fourth piece into the third. Fold again to make reinforced leg. Make 4. Make legs. Unfold a triangular piece. Place another unfolded piece in the center. Push the corners inward to make table top. Insert the points of the fir piece into the fourth.

Unfold one triangle of a IE and insert into the low pocket of table top. Repeat with the remaining legs. Repeat with remaining legs. Insert the final flap under the first triangle. Materials 7: IXX Fold in half. Glue on sequins and beads. Hold the first piece double pocket facing Insert into 3 pes, to make Row 3. Join 4 pes, as Row 6. Open side triangles of Row 5 to form fins. Join 4 pes, as Row 4, then 5 pes, f Row 5. Join 3 pes, as Row 7. Insert side flaps of Row 6 into the outer pockets.

Insert the center 4 points into 1 pc, form Row 8. Insert all points into 1 pc, Repeat Row 10 so the tail tapers. Join 2 pes, to make Row 11, and 1 pc, for Row IS - -- Completed size: Hold a pair of pieces, double pockets down and the right angles away from you. Join them with a piece, the right angle facing you. Rows Join in the same direction. The center of bottom is somewhat twisted.

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Join all sets by inserting adjoining points into a new piece. Join into a ring.

Insert any 2 adjoining points into a piece of handle. Secure handle with glue. ROW 23 Tail Row Row 15 5 pcs. Neck Use small pieces. Make 2 sets for Head. Make 2 sets.

Books of origami

Work as directed above. Row 8: Join by covering side flaps of. Make tail base by joining 1 pc. Split the tail and join 1 pc. Join 1 pc. Join by inserting side flap of Row 5 into the wing.

Materials Make 4 sets. Join into a ring by gluing points. Insert each 24 pcs. Join Row 5 by holding a piece double pocket facing up and the right angle facing in. Work Row 6 in the same manner. Proceed to Step for HAT. Make handle referring to the figure on the opposite page. Fill between pieces by inserting 1 pc.

Check the shape and glue several. Tie ribbon around to finish. Actual size Glue wire onto back side. Be sure to interlock securely. See Step 2, opposite page.! Referring to the figures on the opposite page, Join 2 sets by inserting their adjoining points join 3 pes. Make 18 sets. Continue to form a ring.

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For Row 4 to Row 18, join the pieces Row 18 is completed. Glue wrapped wire onto back side. Form leaves as illustrated below. Turn upside down so the 1st row comes on top. Insert stem into the top and place on the pedestal. USing floral tape, attach leaves around wire, pes, at a time. Add leaves binding with floral tape. Repeat until all leaves are attached. Bind down the tape and make a lump at the end. Insert into the top of the fruit. Insert leaf Signs for piece direction Detail of Step 9, opposite page.

Join them with a piece, right angle facing you. Row 3: Insert yellow and brown pieces alternately, all around. Join yellow pes. Work the same as Row 3. Work the same as Row 2.

Work as directed in the diagram shown on the opposite page. The center of bottom can look somewhat twisted. Join yellow pcs. Make top: Interlock 3 green pes. Make 7 sets. Insert each set of leaves into the fruit as shown on the opposite page. Join 2 adjacent sets by inserting a new piece all around. Check the shape of leaves and glue to secure. Apply some glue onto points of another piece and insert into the pockets. Repeat until Rowand 2 are constructed. Join 15 pcs.

Join Rows 2 and 3 as directed. Turn upside down Work Row 5 by changing colors as directed in the diagram, and add 1 green pc. V as directed il the diagram. Work as directed. Work with white and red. Work with red and black. L;j v: Row 7 4 pes. Insert points of green into double pockets of 2 red pes, Place 1 pc, on each side. Join them with 5 pes, to Join 6 pes, to complete Row complete Row 5.

Join 2 pes. Join 5 pes. Join 4 pcs. Insert a point of green piece into Row 3. Add 3 more green pes, Row 8: Join 3 pes, Glue on black beads to finish. Neck assembly SO for step-by-step instructions. Cover adjoining points of Row 2 with 1 pc, Continue all around to make a eire 27 pes, See diagram on the pre' page for color layout. Work as directed in the diagram until Divide pieces into chest 6 , left wing 5 , Then work on the left wing.

Work on tail part as directed. Right wing Work on the right wing. Work on the chest. Make neck referring to the figure the previous page, and insert into top of chest. Insert after Body JFor now, only the numbers are complete. Add an extra glue tab as necessary. I have a printable set available for each module.

Most origami designers no longer consider models with cuts to be origami, instead using the term Kirigami to describe them. CD Fold in half again. Rows assembly Direction of pieces r:

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